What is the best way to manage stress at work?

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Working pressure

  • Build new, satisfying friendships.
  • Avoid nicotine.
  • To consume with moderation.
  • Create a balanced schedule.
  • Plan regular breaks.
  • ( more )
www.helpguide.org/articles/stress/stress-in-the-workplace…$

While stress in some workplaces is normal, excessive stress can affect your productivity and performance, affect your physical and mental health, and affect your relationships and family life. It can even determine the success or failure of a job. You can't control everything in your work environment, but that doesn't mean you can't do anything, even if you have problems. Whatever your ambitions or professional demands, you can take steps to protect yourself from the destructive effects of stress, increase job satisfaction and increase happiness at work and outside the workplace.

Stress is not always bad. A little stress can help you stay focused, energetic and able to take on new challenges in the workplace. This is what keeps you alert while introducing yourself or reminding you to avoid costly accidents or mistakes. But in today's busy world, the workplace often feels like an emotional roller coaster. Long working hours, tight deadlines and growing demand can worry, tire and overwhelm you. And, when stress exceeds your capacity, it stops helping you and begins to damage your body and mind and your job satisfaction.

If work stress affects your work performance, health or personal life, it's time to take action. It doesn't matter if you make a living or how stressed you are at work, there are many things you can do to reduce your overall stress level and regain control at work.

Common causes of work stress include:

When you feel overwhelmed at work, you lose confidence and can become angry, irritable, or flinch. Other signs and symptoms of excessive work stress include:

Sometimes the best way to reduce stress is to share your stress with the people around you. Yelling and gaining support and sympathy (especially face to face) can be an effective way to release energy and restore calm. Another person doesn't have to "solve" your problem, they just have to listen.

Seek the support of your colleagues. Having a reliable work support system can help you avoid the negative effects of work stress. Remember to listen to them and support them when they need it. If you don't have close friends at work, you can take steps to be more social with your colleagues. For example, when you take a break, instead of drawing your attention to your smartphone, interact with your colleagues.

Count on your friends and family. In addition to increasing social ties at work, having a strong network of friends and family is also important in managing stress in all aspects of life. On the other hand, the more people are alone and isolated, the greater their capacity to resist stress.

Build new, satisfying friendships. If you don't think that someone can turn to work or free time, it's never too late to make a new friendship. Meet new people with common interests by taking classes or joining clubs, or by volunteering. While expanding the social network, helping others (especially those who appreciate it) can be extremely fun and can significantly reduce stress.

When you focus too much on your work, it's easy to neglect your health. But when you support your health through good nutrition and exercise, you become stronger and more resistant to stress.

Taking care of yourself does not require radical lifestyle changes. Even small things can make you feel good, energetic and make you feel like you're back in the driver's seat.

Aerobic exercise is an effective way to improve your mood, energy, concentration and relaxation, it can increase your heart rate and make you sweat. Rhythmic exercises (such as walking, running, dancing, playing the drum, etc.) are particularly soothing to the nervous system. To minimize stress, exercise for as little as 30 minutes in most cases. If it fits your schedule better, divide the event into two or three shorter sections.

And when your work pressure gets heavier, try to take a quick break and get away from stressful environments. If possible, take a walk outside the workplace. Exercise can help you restore balance.

Your food choices can have a huge impact on how you feel during your work day. For example, a reduced, frequent and healthy diet can help your body maintain a consistent blood sugar level. This keeps energy and focus and prevents mood swings. On the other hand, low blood sugar can make you anxious and irritable, and eating too much can make you drowsy.

Minimize sugar and refined carbohydrates. When you're stressed, you may want sweet snacks, pastries, or comfort foods like pasta or fries. But these foods "feel good" quickly lead to emotional and energy breakdown, exacerbating symptoms of stress rather than improving.

Reduce your intake of foods that can affect your mood, such as caffeine, trans fats, and foods rich in chemical preservatives or hormones.

Eating more omega-3 fatty acids can boost mood. The best sources are fatty fish (salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines), algae, flaxseeds and nuts.

Avoid nicotine. Smoking seems to calm you down when you're stressed, but nicotine is a powerful stimulant that can cause anxiety levels rather than reduce them.

To consume with moderation. Alcohol may seem to temporarily relieve your worries, but drinking too much can cause anxiety as it gradually fades and negatively affects your mood.

You may feel like you don't have time to sleep through the night. However, lack of sleep can interfere with your daytime productivity, creativity, problem-solving ability, and concentration. The better you rest, the better you can manage your professional responsibilities and stress.

Improve the quality of your sleep by making healthy changes to your day and night routines. For example, go to bed and get up at the same time each day and even on weekends, stay smart in your diet and daytime diet, and adjust your sleep environment. The goal is 8 hours a night, with most adults needing optimal sleep.

Turn off the screen one hour before bedtime. The light from televisions, tablets, smartphones and computers can inhibit the production of melatonin in your body and can seriously disturb your sleep.

Avoid stimulating activities and stressful places before bedtime, such as catching up from work. Instead, focus on calm and soothing activities, such as reading or listening to light music, while maintaining low light.

Work nights, early mornings or shifts can affect the quality of your sleep, which in turn affects productivity and performance, making you more vulnerable to stress.

When work and work stress threatens you, there are simple and practical steps you can take to regain control.

Create a balanced schedule. Everything works, no game is the secret of burnout. Try to find a balance between work and family life, social and lonely activities, daily chores and downtime.

Leave early. Even 10 to 15 minutes can lead to food cravings and time to relax one day. If you're always late, set the clock and watch quickly to give yourself more time to relieve stress.

Plan regular breaks. Make sure to take short breaks throughout the day, take a walk, chat with friendly faces, or practice relaxation techniques. Also try lunch outside your office or work station. It can help you relax, rejuvenate and be productive instead of less productive.

Establish healthy boundaries. Many of us feel available 24 hours a day or have to keep checking our smartphones for work-related news and updates, which puts them under pressure. But it is important to maintain periods of non-work or non-respect of work. This may mean not checking emails or answering the phone at home at night or on weekends.

Don't over-invest in yourself. Avoid arranging things back to back or trying to get used to too much throughout the day. If you have too much work, distinguish between "should" and "miscellaneous". Put the unnecessary tasks at the bottom of the list or delete them altogether.

Prioritize tasks. Work on high priority tasks first. If you have something particularly unpleasant, please resolve it as soon as possible. As a result, your remaining days will be more enjoyable.

Divide the project into small steps. If a large project seems overwhelmed, focus on one manageable step at a time instead of taking on all the tasks at once.

Delegate responsibility. You don't have to do it all yourself. Let go of controlling every little step. You will release unnecessary stress in the process.

Willing to compromise. Sometimes, if you and your colleague or boss can adjust your expectations slightly, you can find a happy medium that will reduce stress for everyone.

Many of us make work stress worse by negative thoughts and behaviors. If you can reverse these deceptive habits, employers will find it easier to cope with the pressure.

Resist perfectionism. When you set unrealistic goals, you define yourself as unattainable. Look for the best, no one can ask for more.

Revert your negative thoughts. If you focus on the downsides of each situation and interaction, you will find that you are short of energy and motivation. Try to think positively about your work, avoid negative colleagues and refute the little achievements you have made, even if no one else has.

Do not try to control things beyond your control. Many things at work are beyond our control, especially the behavior of others. Rather than focusing on them, focus on things you can control, such as how you choose to respond to problems.

Look for a sense of humor in this situation. When used correctly, humor is a great way to relieve stress at work. When you or those around you start taking your work seriously, find a way to lighten your mood with an interesting joke or story.

Clean up your behavior. If your desk or workspace is a mess, organize and dispose of the debris. Simply knowing everything saves time and reduces stress.

When we feel uncertain, helpless or out of control, our stress levels are at their highest. Here are some things you can do to restore a sense of control over your work and occupation.

Discuss sources of work stress with your employer. Healthy, happy employees increase productivity, so your employer is motivated to deal with workplace stress. Inform your employer of specific conditions that affect your job performance, rather than distributing a list of complaints.

Be clear about your job description. Ask your supervisor for an updated description of your duties and responsibilities. You may find that some stacked tasks are not included in your job description, and you may indicate that you have worked on the job parameters to gain some use for them.

Transfer request. If your workplace is large enough, you can move to another department to escape the toxic environment.

Ask for new responsibilities. If you've been doing exactly the same job for a long time, try something new: different levels, different sales regions, different machines.

Take the time and take a vacation. If burnout seems unavoidable, take complete rest. Take vacations, miss sick leave and request time off, everything can keep you out of trouble. Take the time to charge the battery and gain visibility.

Getting bored or dissatisfied with how most workdays can cause a lot of stress and seriously affect your physical and mental health. But for many of us, having a dream job that we consider meaningful is: dreaming. Even if you can't find another career that you love and are passionate about (and most of us are not), you can still find goals and joy in jobs you don't like. not.

Even in some mundane tasks, you can often focus on how your contributions can help others or provide much-needed products or services. Concentrate on your favorite work, even if you chat with your colleagues at lunch. Changing your attitude toward work can also help you regain a sense of purpose and control.

Employees suffering from work-related stress can lead to lower productivity, shorter work days and increased staff turnover. However, as a manager, supervisor or employer, you can help reduce stress at work. The first step is to play an active model. If you can stay calm in stressful situations, employees can more easily follow suit.

Consult your staff. Talk to them about the specific factors that make their job stressful. Some things, such as equipment failures, lack of staff, or lack of supervisor feedback, can be relatively easy to resolve. Sharing information with employees can also reduce their jobs and future uncertainty.

Communicate face-to-face with your employees. By listening carefully face to face, employees feel heard and understood. Even if you can't change it, it will help you and them alleviate it.

Treat workplace conflicts positively. Respect the dignity of each employee and establish a zero tolerance policy for harassment.

Give workers the opportunity to participate in decisions that affect their work. For example, get employee contributions to work rules. If they participate in this process, they will be more engaged.

Avoid unrealistic delays. Make sure the workload matches the capabilities and resources of your employees.

Clarify your expectations. Clearly define roles, responsibilities and objectives for employees. Ensure that management measures are fair and in line with organizational values.

Offer incentives and incentives. Praise the work verbally and throughout the organization. Plan periods of stress, then set tight deadlines. Provide opportunities for social interaction between employees.

Work stress – Causes of work stress and how to prevent it. (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Work Stress (PDF) – Help and advice for managing work and work stress. (Arcas)

Coping with stress at work – Common resources and steps to follow. (American Psychological Association)

Work Stress Management Strategies for Entrepreneurs – Steps You Can Take to Reduce Employee Stress. (Bupa)

Author: Jenny Sehgal (Jeanne Segal) Ph.D., Massachusetts Melinda Smith (Melinda Smith), Lawrence Robinson (Lawrence Robinson) and Massachusetts Robert Sehgal (Robert Segal) Last updated: October 2019.

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HELPGUIDEORG INTERNATIONAL is a zero-rated 501 (c) 3 organization (ID # 45-4510670). Our content does not constitute medical or psychological advice. Consult a certified medical or mental health professional for a diagnosis. Learn more.

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While stress in some workplaces is normal, excessive stress can affect your productivity and performance, affect your physical and mental health, and affect your relationships and family life. It can even determine the success or failure of a job. You can't control everything in your work environment, but that doesn't mean you can't do anything, even if you have problems. Whatever your ambitions or professional demands, you can take steps to protect yourself from the destructive effects of stress, increase job satisfaction and increase happiness at work and outside the workplace.

Stress is not always bad. A little stress can help you stay focused, energetic and able to take on new challenges in the workplace. This is what keeps you alert while introducing yourself or reminding you to avoid costly accidents or mistakes. But in today's busy world, the workplace often feels like an emotional roller coaster. Long working hours, tight deadlines and growing demand can worry, tire and overwhelm you. And, when stress exceeds your capacity, it stops helping you and begins to damage your body and mind and your job satisfaction.

If work stress affects your work performance, health or personal life, it's time to take action. It doesn't matter if you make a living or how stressed you are at work, there are many things you can do to reduce your overall stress level and regain control at work.

Common causes of work stress include:

When you feel overwhelmed at work, you lose confidence and can become angry, irritable, or flinch. Other signs and symptoms of excessive work stress include:

Sometimes the best way to reduce stress is to share your stress with the people around you. Yelling and gaining support and sympathy (especially face to face) can be an effective way to release energy and restore calm. Another person doesn't have to "solve" your problem, they just have to listen.

Seek the support of your colleagues. Having a reliable work support system can help you avoid the negative effects of work stress. Remember to listen to them and support them when they need it. If you don't have close friends at work, you can take steps to be more social with your colleagues. For example, when you take a break, instead of drawing your attention to your smartphone, interact with your colleagues.

Count on your friends and family. In addition to increasing social ties at work, having a strong network of friends and family is also important in managing stress in all aspects of life. On the other hand, the more people are alone and isolated, the greater their capacity to resist stress.

Build new, satisfying friendships. If you don't think that someone can turn to work or free time, it's never too late to make a new friendship. Meet new people with common interests by taking classes or joining clubs, or by volunteering. While expanding the social network, helping others (especially those who appreciate it) can be extremely fun and can significantly reduce stress.

When you focus too much on your work, it's easy to neglect your health. But when you support your health through good nutrition and exercise, you become stronger and more resistant to stress.

Taking care of yourself does not require radical lifestyle changes. Even small things can make you feel good, energetic and make you feel like you're back in the driver's seat.

Aerobic exercise is an effective way to improve your mood, energy, concentration and relaxation, it can increase your heart rate and make you sweat. Rhythmic exercises (such as walking, running, dancing, playing the drum, etc.) are particularly soothing to the nervous system. To minimize stress, exercise for as little as 30 minutes in most cases. If it fits your schedule better, divide the event into two or three shorter sections.

And when your work pressure gets heavier, try to take a quick break and get away from stressful environments. If possible, take a walk outside the workplace. Exercise can help you restore balance.

Your food choices can have a huge impact on how you feel during your work day. For example, a reduced, frequent and healthy diet can help your body maintain a consistent blood sugar level. This keeps energy and focus and prevents mood swings. On the other hand, low blood sugar can make you anxious and irritable, and eating too much can make you drowsy.

Minimize sugar and refined carbohydrates. When you're stressed, you may want sweet snacks, pastries, or comfort foods like pasta or fries. But these foods "feel good" quickly lead to emotional and energy breakdown, exacerbating symptoms of stress rather than improving.

Reduce your intake of foods that can affect your mood, such as caffeine, trans fats, and foods rich in chemical preservatives or hormones.

Eating more omega-3 fatty acids can boost mood. The best sources are fatty fish (salmon, herring, mackerel, anchovies, sardines), algae, flaxseeds and nuts.

Avoid nicotine. Smoking seems to calm you down when you're stressed, but nicotine is a powerful stimulant that can cause anxiety levels rather than reduce them.

To consume with moderation. Alcohol may seem to temporarily relieve your worries, but drinking too much can cause anxiety as it gradually fades and negatively affects your mood.

You may feel like you don't have time to sleep through the night. However, lack of sleep can interfere with your daytime productivity, creativity, problem-solving ability, and concentration. The better you rest, the better you can manage your professional responsibilities and stress.

Improve the quality of your sleep by making healthy changes to your day and night routines. For example, go to bed and get up at the same time each day and even on weekends, stay smart in your diet and daytime diet, and adjust your sleep environment. The goal is 8 hours a night, with most adults needing optimal sleep.

Turn off the screen one hour before bedtime. The light from televisions, tablets, smartphones and computers can inhibit the production of melatonin in your body and can seriously disturb your sleep.

Avoid stimulating activities and stressful places before bedtime, such as catching up from work. Instead, focus on calm and soothing activities, such as reading or listening to light music, while maintaining low light.

Work nights, early mornings or shifts can affect the quality of your sleep, which in turn affects productivity and performance, making you more vulnerable to stress.

When work and work stress threatens you, there are simple and practical steps you can take to regain control.

Create a balanced schedule. Everything works, no game is the secret of burnout. Try to find a balance between work and family life, social and lonely activities, daily chores and downtime.

Leave early. Even 10 to 15 minutes can lead to food cravings and time to relax one day. If you're always late, set the clock and watch quickly to give yourself more time to relieve stress.

Plan regular breaks. Make sure to take short breaks throughout the day, take a walk, chat with friendly faces, or practice relaxation techniques. Also try lunch outside your office or work station. It can help you relax, rejuvenate and be productive instead of less productive.

Establish healthy boundaries. Many of us feel available 24 hours a day or have to keep checking our smartphones for work-related news and updates, which puts them under pressure. But it is important to maintain periods of non-work or non-respect of work. This may mean not checking emails or answering the phone at home at night or on weekends.

Don't over-invest in yourself. Avoid arranging things back to back or trying to get used to too much throughout the day. If you have too much work, distinguish between "should" and "miscellaneous". Put the unnecessary tasks at the bottom of the list or delete them altogether.

Prioritize tasks. Work on high priority tasks first. If you have something particularly unpleasant, please resolve it as soon as possible. As a result, your remaining days will be more enjoyable.

Divide the project into small steps. If a large project seems overwhelmed, focus on one manageable step at a time instead of taking on all the tasks at once.

Delegate responsibility. You don't have to do it all yourself. Let go of controlling every little step. You will release unnecessary stress in the process.

Willing to compromise. Sometimes, if you and your colleague or boss can adjust your expectations slightly, you can find a happy medium that will reduce stress for everyone.

Many of us make work stress worse by negative thoughts and behaviors. If you can reverse these deceptive habits, employers will find it easier to cope with the pressure.

Resist perfectionism. When you set unrealistic goals, you define yourself as unattainable. Look for the best, no one can ask for more.

Revert your negative thoughts. If you focus on the downsides of each situation and interaction, you will find that you are short of energy and motivation. Try to think positively about your work, avoid negative colleagues and refute the little achievements you have made, even if no one else has.

Do not try to control things beyond your control. Many things at work are beyond our control, especially the behavior of others. Rather than focusing on them, focus on things you can control, such as how you choose to respond to problems.

Look for a sense of humor in this situation. When used correctly, humor is a great way to relieve stress at work. When you or those around you start taking your work seriously, find a way to lighten your mood with an interesting joke or story.

Clean up your behavior. If your desk or workspace is a mess, organize and dispose of the debris. Simply knowing everything saves time and reduces stress.

When we feel uncertain, helpless or out of control, our stress levels are at their highest. Here are some things you can do to restore a sense of control over your work and occupation.

Discuss sources of work stress with your employer. Healthy, happy employees increase productivity, so your employer is motivated to deal with workplace stress. Inform your employer of specific conditions that affect your job performance, rather than distributing a list of complaints.

Be clear about your job description. Ask your supervisor for an updated description of your duties and responsibilities. You may find that some stacked tasks are not included in your job description, and you may indicate that you have worked on the job parameters to gain some use for them.

Transfer request. If your workplace is large enough, you can move to another department to escape the toxic environment.

Ask for new responsibilities. If you've been doing exactly the same job for a long time, try something new: different levels, different sales regions, different machines.

Take the time and take a vacation. If burnout seems unavoidable, take complete rest. Take vacations, miss sick leave and request time off, everything can keep you out of trouble. Take the time to charge the battery and gain visibility.

Getting bored or dissatisfied with how most workdays can cause a lot of stress and seriously affect your physical and mental health. But for many of us, having a dream job that we consider meaningful is: dreaming. Even if you can't find another career that you love and are passionate about (and most of us are not), you can still find goals and joy in jobs you don't like. not.

Even in some mundane tasks, you can often focus on how your contributions can help others or provide much-needed products or services. Concentrate on your favorite work, even if you chat with your colleagues at lunch. Changing your attitude toward work can also help you regain a sense of purpose and control.

Employees suffering from work-related stress can lead to lower productivity, shorter work days and increased staff turnover. However, as a manager, supervisor or employer, you can help reduce stress at work. The first step is to play an active model. If you can stay calm in stressful situations, employees can more easily follow suit.

Consult your staff. Talk to them about the specific factors that make their job stressful. Some things, such as equipment failures, lack of staff, or lack of supervisor feedback, can be relatively easy to resolve. Sharing information with employees can also reduce their jobs and future uncertainty.

Communicate face-to-face with your employees. By listening carefully face to face, employees feel heard and understood. Even if you can't change it, it will help you and them alleviate it.

Treat workplace conflicts positively. Respect the dignity of each employee and establish a zero tolerance policy for harassment.

Give workers the opportunity to participate in decisions that affect their work. For example, get employee contributions to work rules. If they participate in this process, they will be more engaged.

Avoid unrealistic delays. Make sure the workload matches the capabilities and resources of your employees.

Clarify your expectations. Clearly define roles, responsibilities and objectives for employees. Ensure that management measures are fair and in line with organizational values.

Offer incentives and incentives. Praise the work verbally and throughout the organization. Plan periods of stress, then set tight deadlines. Provide opportunities for social interaction between employees.

Work stress – Causes of work stress and how to prevent it. (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health)

Work Stress (PDF) – Help and advice for managing work and work stress. (Arcas)

Coping with stress at work – Common resources and steps to follow. (American Psychological Association)

Work Stress Management Strategies for Entrepreneurs – Steps You Can Take to Reduce Employee Stress. (Bupa)

Author: Jenny Sehgal (Jeanne Segal) Ph.D., Massachusetts Melinda Smith (Melinda Smith), Lawrence Robinson (Lawrence Robinson) and Massachusetts Robert Sehgal (Robert Segal) Last updated: October 2019.

HelpGuide supporters

privacy policy

Terms of use

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about us

Harvard Cooperation

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Weekly advice on mental health and health.

HELPGUIDEORG INTERNATIONAL is a zero-rated 501 (c) 3 organization (ID # 45-4510670). Our content does not constitute medical or psychological advice. Consult a certified medical or mental health professional for a diagnosis. Learn more.

As a small non-profit website that does not run ads, we are counting on your support. Our readers provide only a small portion, but if everyone donates $ 5, we can make sure HelpGuide remains ad-free and growing. Please donate today.

Make a donation now

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